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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) — A portion of the historic Annie Merts Center in Huntsville’s Twickenham district has been approved for demolition by the Huntsville Historic Preservation Commission.

Built in 1928, the building currently houses Huntsville City Schools Administration building but the district is moving and selling the building to a real estate developer.

Before the $3.5 million dollar sale of Annie Merts to Crunkleton Associates is final, they wanted approval from the historic preservation commission to demolish a portion of the historic building.

The HHPC approved the demolition of the east and west wings, gymnasium/auditorium, data building on the southeast side, walkways, canopies, fencing and decommissioned mechanical equipment.

Crunkleton plans to turn the original 1928 building into 15 condos and subdivide the extra land space for individual homes.

The demolition approval came with stipulations. Crunkleton’s development proposal had eight lots for single-family homes.

The stipulations are as listed:

  1. The applicant will return for approval of refurbished elevation treatments
  2. The applicant will meet all subdivision requirements of the planning department including any stipulations in the zoning adjustment
  3. There will be no buildable lots platted north of the north façade of the building to be preserved
  4. The existing contributing limestone retaining wall along that frontage will be preserved in its entirety
  5. The applicant will ask the property owner (HCS) to partition the parking site to the east into the historic district

With new stipulations, the proposed lots will have to be redrawn and pushed back to not go in front of the historic building. A representative with Crunkleton says they are depending on selling the lots to fund the re-development and fewer lots for sale could impact the financial deal with the school system.

The contract to sell the building and land isn’t finalized between the school district and the developer.

Crunkleton says they are still in the due diligence phase.