Federal judge blocks Alabama abortion ban

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A federal judge has temporarily blocked an Alabama law that makes it illegal for abortion providers to perform almost any abortions in the state.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson issued an injunction Tuesday blocking authorities from enforcing the law until the court case is resolved.

In his opinion, Thompson wrote that the Alabama law "would impose a substantial and irreparable harm, leaving many patients without recourse."

Read the full opinion here.

Several abortion providers in the state sued after the Alabama Legislature passed the law earlier this year, claiming it was unconstitutional under Roe vs. Wade. The law was set to go into effect in November.

Dr. Yashica Robinson is the director of The Alabama Women's Center, one of three clinics in the state that provides abortions. Robinson is a plaintiff in the case. She released a statement that said, "This win is critical to our patients and to health care providers like myself.  The abortion care we provide is essential health care, and these ruthless attacks from anti-abortion politicians have no place in Alabama.  We will keep fighting to ensure that we can provide care that our patients need and to keep abortion accessible in our communities.”

Alabama is one of several states seeking to ignite legal fights in the hopes of getting the Supreme Court to reconsider legalized abortion.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall released a statement Tuesday morning, calling the decision "not unexpected."

"The district court’s decision to grant the plaintiffs’ request for a preliminary injunction of Alabama’s 2019 abortion law as to pre-viability abortions was not unexpected.  As we have stated before, the State’s objective is to advance our case to the U.S. Supreme Court where we intend to submit evidence that supports our argument that Roe and Casey were wrongly decided and that the Constitution does not prohibit states from protecting unborn children from abortion."

A representative from the AG's office say they are not sure when Judge Thompson will make his ruling.

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