Scattered storms are back for Wednesday, and some could be heavy!

A batch of muggier air just southeast of us over Georgia Tuesday afternoon moves northwest into Alabama on Wednesday; that steamier air means a return to scattered showers and thunderstorms ahead of another cold front on Wednesday: showers in the morning, some heavier storms in the afternoon and evening.

The Storm Prediction Center outlines a ‘MARGINAL’ risk of severe storms in northeastern Alabama and Tennessee for Wednesday: mainly for the risk of a brief strong wind gust over 60 miles per hour and some small hail.

While most of our storms will not be severe, a hand full of them could create some temporary problems between 11 AM and 7 PM. Drier air takes over again behind the storms, and the weather looks fantastic for the end of the week!

Track heavy storms with WHNT.com’s Interactive Radar or swipe over to the radar feature on Live Alert 19!

Another refreshing breeze: The muggy air on Wednesday moves out again for Thursday and Friday. This is about as nice as it’s going to get for a while, too!

Huntsville’s record lows on Thursday and Friday mornings look like this:

Thursday Record: 50ºF in 1985. Forecast: 60ºF
Friday Record: 51ºF in 1985. Forecast: 55ºF.

It’s not quite record chill coming down the pike, but it will be a nice breath of fresh air for the end of the week.

Weekend is back to summer: The sting of summer complete with high humidity and hotter temperatures returns for the weekend: so do scattered showers and thunderstorms. Expect highs in the upper 80s and lower 90s as well as warmer, more humid nights: lows in the 60s and 70s.

Weekend storms follow the usual summer pattern of “there ain’t one.” Seemingly random downpours will develop, rain, lightning, thunder, and dissipate without moving much.

That means some spots will get soaked while many others just stay hot and humid.

Lightning will be the biggest danger with storms this weekend; wind could pose a secondary threat for boaters on area lakes (it’ll be a little breezy even away from storms).

While lightning fatalities are not nearly as high as they used to be, it’s still a good idea to practice the wisdom contained in the saying ‘When thunder roars, go indoors!’  The main reason there aren’t as many deaths and injuries now is because of awareness and people heeding warnings; don’t be a statistic.  Lightning can be deadly; avoid being outside at all costs when storms are nearby.

Looking for the rest of the forecast? It’s always online at WHNT.com/Weather and in the “Daily Forecast” section on Live Alert 19!

-Jason
Connect with me!
Facebook: Jason Simpson’s Fan Page
Twitter: @simpsonwhnt

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.