Mueller did not find Trump campaign “conspired or coordinated” with Russia

(Photo: MGN Online)

The Justice Department sent Congress the principal conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation Sunday afternoon.

Mueller submitted his report on Friday, bringing an end to a nearly two-year-old investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin.

Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein spent the weekend going through Mueller’s report at Justice Department headquarters to determine what information could be made public.

The White House had not seen the report as of Sunday morning, but CBS News’ Major Garrett reported the president’s lawyers believe Mr. Trump will be found to be largely if not completely in the clear, legally and politically, given that there are no new indictments. The president spent the weekend at Mar-a-Lago and has said nothing about the investigation’s end. On Saturday, he played golf with Kid Rock and tweeted, “Have a Great Day!” on Sunday morning.

Whatever the report’s conclusions, Democratic lawmakers and 2020 candidates have begun to call for the release of Mueller’s full report, as well as underlying material from the special counsel’s investigation. Both Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill huddled over conference calls to discuss the report over the weekend.

It’s also likely that Mueller will be called before Congress to testify.

Around 2:30 p.m., Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chair of the House Judiciary Committee, confirmed Congress had received the letter and began detailing some of the findings.

Special counsel Robert Mueller did not exonerate President Donald Trump of obstruction of justice or find that he committed a crime.

That’s according to a summary of Mueller’s findings provided to Congress by the Justice Department.

The summary also says Mueller did not find that the Trump campaign or its associates “conspired or coordinated” with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 election.

The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee says a letter from the Justice Department describing special counsel Robert Mueller’s findings “does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

The department sent the letter to Rep. Jerrold Nadler on Sunday afternoon. Nadler tweeted that the Justice Department “determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment.”

Around 3 p.m., CBS News reported special counsel Robert Mueller was not consulted about William Barr’s letter.

The Associated Press also contributed to this report.

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