Lauderdale authorities not notified for hours about state prison escapee

LAUDERDALE COUNTY, Ala. - Lauderdale County authorities said they did not know Corey Davis escaped St. Clair Correctional Facility Wednesday until 11:30 Thursday morning. Davis escaped at 8 p.m., Alabama Department of Corrections said.

Those authorities said ADOC did not even put out a "be on the lookout" notice until after they saw it on the morning news and called state authorities.

Under Alabama law, the state agency who has custody of the escaped inmate is mandated to notify, within 12 hours of the escape, the governor, department of public safety, sheriff and district attorney of the county where the inmate escaped, sheriff and district attorney of the county where the inmate was most recently convicted, the chief of police in the last city where a conviction occurred (if applicable), sheriff of the county where the escapee lives, police chief of the city where the inmate lives and all media outlets.

ADOC said they have been in contact with the Lauderdale County District Attorney's Victim Services and spoke with one of Davis' victims, who asked to be notified after he is recaptured.

ADOC said they entered Davis' escape in the National Crime Investigation Center database so law enforcement agencies nationwide will know Davis is on the run.

After news of Davis' escape, WHNT News 19 dug into his criminal record. We found convictions in Lauderdale, Limestone and Colbert Counties. Back in 2017, he pleaded guilty to two counts of human trafficking, in exchange, the state dropped the sexual torture, rape, kidnapping, sodomy and impersonating an officer charges against him. The plea agreement mandated Davis serves concurrent life sentences with the possibility of parole.

In Limestone County in 2009, he pleaded guilty to arson. According to the court documents, on Oct 25, 2009, a man called 911 because his living room was 'severely burned.' When police investigated it, they called it 'arson' because of the three different points it started.

Then, four days later, the caller received notice from a check cashing company. They said Davis was trying to cash a check from the caller. When told he couldn't cash it, Davis left the business, but also left behind fingerprints and ID.

Then, authorities called the Polk Co. Sheriff's Office and asked them to check the last known address of Davis's mother in Lakeland, FL. They found him there with a stolen car and many items that belonged to the Athens home owner who called 911 initially.

They also found the 911 caller's Savage .243 bolt action rifle. The document says Davis worked as a cab driver for Dixie Cab Co. in Athens and drove the man home from a local business. They said he was familiar with the caller's schedule.

He took a plea deal to plead guilty to arson, in exchange, the court dropped the burglary charge against him.

ADOC said they are not yet releasing the details of how Davis escaped prison.

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