Old Greenbrier Restaurant patrons react to the future Toyota-Mazda plant

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MADISON Ala. -- Next to the site of the future Toyota-Mazda plant is the Old Greenbrier Restaurant, a community staple that has been around for over 60 years.

"It makes me want to sing Green Acres coming out here," said Marcus Cochran, an Old Greenbrier patron. "It has that feel to it. But the people in here are just good ol' country people."

Cochran said he goes to the Old Greenbrier Restaurant to get away from it all and enjoy a nice country meal. He said he hopes the new Toyota-Mazda plant won't change that.

"I'd sure hate to lose it," Cochran said. "It's kind of like a little gold mine out here in the middle of nowhere."

Greg Tanksley,  who works in commercial real estate, said the plant is wonderful news for the industry and the community.

"What's gonna happen to this area, right in here, from County Line Road to I-65 is going to explode with growth over the next few years."

He said his only concern is traffic and if the roads can keep up.

"But a lot of communities would love to have that problem though," said Tanksley.

Lexington Mayor Sandra Burroughs said the plant will not only benefit Madison, but all of the surrounding counties.

"This is the best news we've had in years and years and years," Burroughs said. "This is 4,000 people and 4,000 new jobs in our area that are good paying jobs. It's going to make a big difference for all of us."

The land that Greenbrier is on is owned by John Horton's family farm. He said he's proud of Alabama and that the new plant will change the community, but that's just how it goes.

"I love the people around here. This is my home, my heart's here," Horton said. "But I'm 60 now, and I've seen a lot of change anyhow. Like I said I'm just gonna roll with the punches."

The owners of Old Greenbrier said there's no need to worry, they aren't going anywhere. They plan on open up for breakfast to serve construction workers at the plant.