Local pilot captures eclipse from 4,500 feet up

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TAFT, Ala. -  One man attempted to chase Monday's eclipse, and he succeeded, capturing the event in all its glory via airplane.

Paul Johnson prepped his plane over the weekend to fly on Monday. He covered the aircraft in 5 Go-Pros to get a bird's eye point of view of The Great American Eclipse.

"Maximum when the sun was blocked was at 1:28 p.m. in the Nashville area. So about 50 minutes before that was when I took off," says Paul Johnson.

The idea? To chase the eclipse from the air. "I'm always somebody that does things different. And that was just something that just popped into my head," says Johnson.

He headed west. "I wanted to see it coming."

As the sky began to darken, an eerie feeling took over. "It was almost like you`re losing your vision and me flying an airplane with no auto pilot, I was concerned. But as it got dark, it just became night time."

At least within the shadow of the moon.

"The amazing thing was the whole entire horizon around me, just a slither was lit up," says Johnson. "Then it passed as quickly as it came."

Cameras mounted at every angle, captured every moment. Something this pilot says he will cherish forever. "Ecstatic. It`s perfect. A couple of seconds after it happened I was just thumbs up, yeah!"

Johnson has seen an eclipse before, but this bird`s eye view, watching the effects of the eclipse from above, "I was looking for the max cool factor and I got it."

We asked if he would do it again? He says "Absolutely. It was really unique."

Paul was not wearing eclipse glasses, because he wasn't watching it- just the effects of it so he could focus on flying.