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Most drivers admit angry, aggressive behavior or road rage

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A furious man driving, shot with a very wide fisheye lens, and treated with a motion blur effect.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Do most drivers engage in some kind of road rage?

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says nearly 8 out of 10 U.S. drivers it surveyed admit expressing anger, aggression or road rage at least once in the previous year. That includes either following too closely, yelling at another driver, cutting them off or making angry gestures.

And an estimated 8 million drivers engaged in more extreme behavior that might be considered “road rage,” including bumping or ramming a vehicle on purpose or getting out of their cars to confront another driver.

Sociologists say they’re not surprised that the most aggressive and aggrieved drivers are young men ages 19 to 39. And male drivers are three times more likely than women to have gotten out of a car to confront another driver or rammed another vehicle on purpose.

 

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