Boaz High students to give input in Montgomery

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BOAZ, Ala. (WHNT) -- Boaz High School is wrapping up a semester that unveiled new resources available for its students.   Those efforts will allow three students to be heard in Montgomery.

Inside Boaz High School, you'll find a fully functional bank, a full professional level culinary school and restaurant, and a full medical wing. It's all part of the H3 academy, new to Boaz high school, but months in the making.

Some of the branches of the academy include health science, culinary and tourism, and business management.

"Our BELLA Academy is business education, leadership, law and liberal arts, and we have ESTEM and that is our environmental, science, technology, engineering and math," Boaz City Schools Superintendent Mark Isley says.

There is also a sports medicine pathway and a restaurant that serves food cooked in the culinary school.

The branches of the academy are hands on, and are in addition to regular classwork. "They will go through an orientation in their freshman year, and they will select a career pathway at the beginning of their sophomore year," Isley explains, "They will be in that career pathway for three years."

Dual enrollment is also an option. The school system was able to construct the academy using grants and community support.

Each of labs have adjacent classrooms.

The goal is to give students the opportunity to step into a career, have a chance to become certified in different fields, and prepare them for jobs available in Marshall County.

A visit by state education officials to tour the new resource ended with three students being selected from three branches of the academy to take part in an Alabama Workforce Council strategic planning session. The visit took place several weeks ago and school officials say the students have been asked to return to Montgomery.

Lizeth Esquivel, Ty Kirkland and Emma Roberts are the students who will be returning to Montgomery to give their input at state level. "It's basically to develop a plan to see how we can improve our college and careers," Isley explains.

"This is a good way to go," Roberts says, "Academies will help, and if that student decides that they don't want to fulfill that career, well good. They found out early."

"The academies help you realize what you really want to do in life," Esquivel explains, "At the beginning, before I started the health science program, I wanted to be a lawyer, but then I started the academy and I know exactly what I want to be. I want to be a dentist."

School officials say the students input will provide feedback about futures across the board.