TAKING ACTION: How to get answers to questions about tornado sirens where you live

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JACKSON CO., Ala. (WHNT) -- A viewer in Jackson County contacted us wanting to know if the tornado siren in Rosalie was working. We're taking action to get answers on how Emergency Management officials check the sirens, and what to do if you have questions about one near your home.

Inside the Jackson County Emergency Management Agency a machine spits out white paper covered in information. It's communicating to the EMA information from each county-run siren across Jackson County. "We test them every week," EMA deputy director Felix Jackson says. "We do a silent test of each tornado siren in the county and it runs a report and that way we know if we've got any trouble areas."

Jackson says in addition to that they also do audible tests on each siren in good weather. "It's the first Monday of every month."

Jackson says the residents' help is beneficial during those tests. "We would like people to call in to the EMA office and say 'hey, we heard the siren,' please let us know that feed back. It helps us."

The EMA has officials working across the county on those audible tests but the more ears the better. The EMA also has crews routinely working on the county's sirens as needed and those weekly tests help determine which one needs help and where.

However, if you have questions about your tornado siren where you live, there are answers and if needed -- a fix. "They should call us. Without a doubt. If they've got any questions whatsoever about their siren, please call the EMA office," Jackson says.

EMA officials say you can also call your local city hall to have someone there get in touch with the EMA and put your questions to rest.

Bridgeport and Stevenson in Jackson County run their own tornado sirens, but in all other areas of the county, the county's EMA operates them.