Southbound lanes of I-65 shut down in Morgan County because of damaged bridge

Old and rare tree set to be cut down in Scottsboro, but there’s good news

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

SCOTTSBORO, Ala. (WHNT) — Several Jackson county residents have taken a stand for a nearly 100-year-old tree in the Scottsboro downtown square, but the commission has finally set a date to cut it down.

The branches of the Norway maple have grown along with Scottsboro for the last several decades.  The commission plans to have it cut down next weekend, after much consideration and expert opinions.

Commission Chairman Matthew Hodges understands the concerns about cutting down the old and rare tree. He says experts have told the commission this type of tree in this environment usually doesn’t live to be decades old. However, the potential for falling limbs forced the commission make the move to cut it down, even though many residents are opposed.

“We’ll do it after business hours, though, so it won’t interrupt the flow of traffic and won’t be any issues there,” Hodges says.

But there’s some good news for those residents who don’t want to see the old tree go. “We happened to find some small saplings that had started to grow in a nearby plant bed, so we’re able to get those plants dug up and the Scottsboro High School Ag Department has taken those and potted those, and they’re going to grow them for us,” Hodges says.

When the offspring of the tree get bigger, some will be planted right where the tree stands now, so when the old one is gone, a new one will stand in its place, maybe for another near century.

County leaders say they would like to see the wood from the tree be used for benches for the downtown square, and incorporated into the city’s art culture.