Taking Action: Protecting Your Lawn In Extreme Heat

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) - Many of us are used to looking at our lush, green lawns and being able to water them on a regular basis. However, because of this extreme heat and watering restrictions, many yards are turning brown. What can you do to keep your grass green, but still abide by the rules?

WHNT News 19 met with a local lawn care specialist who showed us several things you can do to maintain your yard.

Brian Richey, the owner of Soft-N-Green, has been in the business of making yards look great for almost a decade. He says most grass is under a lot of stress. The first thing you need to do is follow the rules.

"Check with your utility company to see if there are any water restrictions," says Richey.

If it's allowed, water your yard early in the day.

"We always recommend watering early in the morning, between the hours of 4:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m.," says Richey.

It's also important to follow a schedule.

"If you're not under any restrictions, water three days a week, 30-45 minutes a zone," explains Richey.

Richey says never water at night.

"If you water at night, it could cause some disease problems because the yard never gets a chance to dry out," says Richey.

He also suggests adjusting how you cut the grass during this hot weather.

"The longer you leave the grass, the more protection it's going to get from the sun," says Richey. "You always want to mow with a sharp blade right now. If you have a dull mowing blade, that will shred the grass and it can promote fungus."

As frustrating as it can be to see a nice green lawn turn brown, don't give up on your grass.

"Do your best rain dance right now," jokes Richey. "If we do get some rain, those yards are going to come back."

If you don't have an irrigation system or use a company to maintain your yard, Richey recommends using a slow release fertilizer that breaks down over time. He also says you could put iron down to give your yard that green color.

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