MLB Opening Day Starts New Season for Scalpers

A new season is here, and it brings blue skies, sunny weather, cold drinks, short sleeves, and the smell of fresh dirt and grass. No, we’re not talking about spring. Opening day, March 29, marks the start of the 2018 Major League Baseball season.

Many Americans can’t wait to get out and enjoy their first game of the year. If you’re looking for tickets, keep in mind that scammers and scalpers are looking to take advantage of eager fans in search of seats. Here are some tips to help you have a home run hit of a day at the ballpark.

  • Don’t show up empty-handed. Ticket scalpers’ prime targets are desperate fans looking to find last-minute seats. If you deal with these fraudsters, you could end up with extremely overpriced tickets, or even fakes.
  • Deal with a licensed broker. If you’re not buying tickets directly from the team or stadium, make sure you’re dealing with a member of the National Association of Ticket Brokers. NATB has a 200 percent guarantee on tickets that don’t arrive in time for your game—a promise unlicensed sellers may not be able to offer.
  • Check out the company with the BBB. Investigate the company on bbb.org and see if there’s any suspicious complaint activity from customers (a quick Google search doesn’t hurt, either).
  • Look up the seats. You can find a map of the stadium on the team or stadium’s website, and make sure to ask for the section, row, and seat numbers of the tickets you’d like. Compare them with the map, so you don’t end up with an obstructed view or other nasty surprise.
  • Take care when buying online. If you’re shopping for tickets on the Internet, make sure that when you hand over your payment information, you’re not taking additional risks. Check to see if the URL begins with “https://” and has a little lock icon, which signifies that the website is secured.
  • Pay with a credit card. When making a purchase online, using a credit card is best, since most card issuers have you covered for fraud protection. Never use a debit card, money order, wire transfer, prepaid card, or check, since there’s little chance of recourse in case of a scam.

If you think you’ve purchased a counterfeit ticket, immediately report it to the National Association of Ticket Brokers’ hotline at 630-510-4594 and file a complaint.

Source: BBB of North Alabama and NATB

To report a scam, go to the BBB Scam Tracker. To find trustworthy businesses, go to https://www.bbb.org