Working on Cyber Security is a full time job

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- There are threats to the United States and our allies that are obvious.  North Korea for instance. The reaction from those charged with America's missile defense is pretty straight forward. "I am very confident that the current ballistic missile system can defend the nation against the current threats," said Lt. General Samuel Greaves, Director of the Missile Defense Agency.

The threat from cyber criminals may be a little tougher to stop. It never goes away, and it always changes. "Literally every day, every week, something new is going on and keeping on top of that, it's like the wild west still," said the co-founder of Huntsville's Sentar, Peter Kiss.

It is a wild west where companies like Sentar are working to provide cyber security. It's a situation where the Army actually has a cyber security field manual. F-M 3-12 is not pleasure reading. It is the manual for cyberspace and electronic warfare operations, both offensive and defensive. "While a lot of folks might find the offense side more cool or interesting, if we don't defend ourselves appropriately, and we can't utilize the logistics and sustainment and all the capabilities that we've brought into the Army to help support the war fighter," said Dr. Dawn Dunkerly, the Chief of the Cyber Section at the Army Materiel Command.

The ongoing situation is also driving innovation. One Huntsville company, Avant is working with hack proof hardware. The guys who own the company say their product and other innovations now on the market to make cyber networks secure, are crucial. "We want to get this out in the critical infrastructure and protect our country, says Avant's Adam Raper.

As always that is a full-time job, and in north Alabama there are people on the job every day fighting cyber enemies.