Tropical Storm Irma Develops in the Atlantic

Just west of of the Cape Verde Islands a tropical wave has developed into Tropical Storm Irma. Irma is already a strong tropical storm, producing sustained winds of 50 mph.

Irma will likely remain a tropical storm over the next couple of days before moving over warmer waters by Saturday. As the storm moves over more favorable conditions for development Irma could become a hurricane over the weekend, just east of the Lesser Antilles.

It’s still too far out to say if this storm could have any impacts on the US, but we’ll be keeping a close eye on it.

The most recent discussion on Irma from the National Hurricane Center is below:

BULLETIN
Tropical Storm Irma Advisory Number 1
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL112017
1100 AM AST Wed Aug 30 2017

…IRMA FORMS OVER THE FAR EASTERN ATLANTIC…
…NO IMMEDIATE THREAT TO LAND…

SUMMARY OF 1100 AM AST…1500 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————–
LOCATION…16.4N 30.3W
ABOUT 420 MI…675 KM W OF THE CABO VERDE ISLANDS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…50 MPH…85 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…W OR 280 DEGREES AT 13 MPH…20 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1004 MB…29.65 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
At 1100 AM AST (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Irma was
located near latitude 16.4 North, longitude 30.3 West. Irma is
moving toward the west near 13 mph (20 km/h) and this general motion
is expected to continue for the next couple of days.

Satellite wind data indicate that the maximum sustained winds are
near 50 mph (85 km/h) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is
forecast during the next 48 hours and Irma could become a hurricane
on Friday.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km)
from the center.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 mb (29.65 inches).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
None