More showers and storms: scattered, smothered and covered on Thursday

The first wave of widespread storms Wednesday afternoon dropped as much as 1-2″ in a few spots while leaving others bone dry.  More locally-heavy downpours tonight could do the same: some get wet, others get left without much rain at all.

Occasional lightning creates some thunder that may startle you out of bed in the night; we see no real threat of ‘severe’ weather, but a few of these storms could get pretty heavy through daybreak.  Rain gear is a good idea for the bus stop and for the morning commute. The hit-or-miss nature of the rain is chaotic: scattered storms leave us all smothered in humidity and some covered up with heavy downpours.

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Thursday brings another day of scattered, locally-heavy showers and storms. It’s more of the same thing we’ve had all week long, and a chance does not mean that you will definitely get rain. That chance is based on confidence and coverage of rainfall through the day; some get a lot, some get very little (or nothing at all). Those spots that get little to no rain get hotter than others: highs 85-89ºF with a southwest breeze up to 15 miles per hour.

Track heavy storms with WHNT.com’s Interactive Radar or swipe over to the radar feature on Live Alert 19!

Friday and the weekend: The ‘thunderstorm chaos’ repeats itself daily through the weekend and even Monday of next week: some get wet, some just stay hot, humid and rain-free in the course of the day.

Friday’s coverage of thunderstorms decreases, but any of them that develop could get heavy quickly (up to 1″ of rain possible from any single downpour).

Storms thin out considerably on Saturday. The chance of any one community in North Alabama or Southern Tennessee seeing measurable rain Saturday is only around 10-20% at best. A few isolated showers are possible, but widespread rain seems unlikely.

We see the storms getting more numerous again Sunday and Monday because a cold front moving into the Valley stalls; that focuses the heat and humidity into more widespread showers and storms on those two days.

-Jason
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