Emily Moving Northeast – Now East of Florida Coast

Tropical Storm Emily formed in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of west-central Florida early Monday morning. The storm moved fast, making landfall at 10:45 Monday morning over Bradenton, FL. Once the storm moved over land it began to weaken and is now a Tropical Depression.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the system is weaken down to 30 mph Tuesday morning

4am Tuesday Morning Track

 

The system continues northeast today over the open Atlantic.

The most recent advisory form the National hurricane Center can be found below:

Tropical Depression Emily Advisory Number   6
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL062017
500 AM EDT Tue Aug 01 2017

…POORLY ORGANIZED EMILY MOVES OVER THE WESTERN ATLANTIC…

 

SUMMARY OF 500 AM EDT…0900 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————-
LOCATION…28.3N 80.1W
ABOUT 50 MI…85 KM NNE OF VERO BEACH FLORIDA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…30 MPH…45 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…ENE OR 65 DEGREES AT 12 MPH…19 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1011 MB…29.86 INCHES

 

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

 

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
At 500 AM EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression Emily
was located near latitude 28.3 North, longitude 80.1 West. The
depression is moving toward the east-northeast near 12 mph (19
km/h). A turn toward the northeast with an increase in forward speed
is expected today.  On the forecast track, the center of Emily will
move away from the east-central coast of Florida today and remain
well off the southeast U.S. coast during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph (45 km/h) with higher gusts.
Some slight strengthening is possible during the day or so, but
Emily is also forecast to lose its tropical characteristics within a
day or two.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 1011 mb (29.86 inches).

 

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
RAINFALL:  Emily is expected to produce additional rainfall of 1 to
2 inches with isolated amounts up to 4 inches across portions of
central and southern Florida.