Chapman P-8 celebrates Black History Month with guest speaker Sonnie Hereford IV

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - As African-American history month comes to a close, Chapman P-8 is celebrating how far we've come and how far we have yet to go.

Songs, speeches and symbolic dancing made the African-American history month program at Chapman complete.

Middle school choir director Ashley Daniel says this day stands for more than the rights of just African-Americans.

"Whether it's women's rights, African-American civil rights, it could be rights of just children in general," said Daniel. "That's what we're talking about today."

Sonnie Hereford IV talks with students at Chapman P-8 School.

Sonnie Hereford IV talks with students at Chapman P-8 School.

While watching the performances, students, faculty and parents listened to stories shared by someone involved in one of the pivotal moments in the civil rights movement.

Sonnie Hereford IV was the first of four black students to attend a white public school in Alabama.

A young Sonnie Hereford IV walks with his father, Dr. Sonnie Hereford III.

A young Sonnie Hereford IV walks with his father, Dr. Sonnie Hereford III.

"I want them to appreciate that the people who did these things, when I integrated the school, I had just turned 6, so I wasn't involved in the planning, but my parents and the young adults -- they are heroes," said Hereford. "They were so brave and they were so good at figuring out a good strategy and I want these kids to appreciate the heroism that it took to get us to where we are."

Hereford says there are still bridges to cross in Huntsville.

"I'm really proud for the progress that we've made," said Hereford. "I'm proud to have been one of the ones to help open the doors."