KidCam: Falkville Pre-K students report the weather!

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Ever since I was five years old, I wanted to work at a news station as a meteorologist. Well the Falkville Pre-K Weather Watchers have me beat -- they set up their own "studio", and they invited me down for a weather report!

Falkville Pre-K Weather Watchers (Photo: Jona Nelson)

Falkville Pre-K Weather Watchers (Photo: Jona Nelson)

Complete with a "director" and a "camera man" as well as an anchor, the students take turn reporting the day's weather in a set that they built in Ms. Jona Nelson's classroom.

The kids speak into a "microphone" while pointing to weather icons and radar images, and they learn what to expect for the rest of the day from observing their friends' "forecasts".

A student wear red (for warm air) pushes against a student wearing blue (for cold air). Where their hands meet signals the "front" between the two "air masses". (Photo: Jona Nelson)

A student wear red (for warm air) pushes against a student wearing blue (for cold air). Where their hands meet signals the "front" between the two "air masses". (Photo: Jona Nelson)

Even though they are in Pre-K, the students are really smart.

For example, we talked about all of the different instruments that meteorologists use, and many of them were already familiar with what rain looks like on a radar.

We also talked about the various symbols on a weather map. I explained that a red "L" stands for "Lousy Weather" (like rain and thunderstorms); a blue "H" stands for "Happy Weather" (like sunshine).

We even talked about cold fronts! One student, who was wearing blue, symbolized cold air; the other student -- wearing red -- symbolized warm air. Where their hands came together served as the boundary of the two types of air, or a front. When the "cold air" student stepped forward, they became the advancing cold front;  when the "warm air" student stepped forward, they became the advancing warm front.

(MORE: Students Ask 'How Do You Become a Meteorologist?)

Students learn about how Storm Hunter 19 works. (Photo: Jona Nelson)

Students learn about how Storm Hunter 19 works. (Photo: Jona Nelson)

Afterwards, I showed the students Storm Hunter 19, and I explained to them how I am able to report the weather while standing outside in the middle of it.

The kids were so excited to see the vehicle, and they wanted to know what the thing on top was and how everything worked.

My favorite part of the visit is when the kids kept running up to me to give me a big, ol' hug... And a few of them said they wanted to grow up and be meteorologists, too. I had a blast -- thank you, Ms. Jona Nelson and the Falkville Pre-K Weather Watchers for inviting me!

- Christina

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Facebook: Christina Edwards, WHNT
Twitter: @ChristinaWHNTwx