Attracting pollinators to your garden

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One third of everything we eat requires a pollinator to make that food. So it's important to keep pollinators like butterflies, bees, and birds around. If you've already planted a pollinator garden, you've gotten to know what it takes to successfully attract those winged helpers. Other than plant choice, which is of course the main ingredient in a garden, there are other factors that go into attracting pollinators to your garden.

The bees, butterflies, and birds need the pollen and nectar to eat, but they also need something to drink. A birdbath, a dripping hose, or a shallow dish of water will help quench their thirst. Once they've gotten a drink, they need a place to live. Certain bees like to nest underneath rocks, in an old log, or even in an upside down pot. Some insects like to burrow in the open ground. They can make a home in some uncultivated, plain old dirt in the sunshine.

While you want to include those things to attract the good critters, there may also be some insects you don't want hanging around in your garden. In order to control the bugs you don't want on your plants while saving your pollinators, you can use an insecticide. It's best to use a less toxic version, and the best time to apply the insecticide is at night. Of course you should follow the instructions on the label. The goal is only to kill what you need to and not hurt the good pollinators.