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“The Giving Tree” At Clements High School

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CLEMENTS, Ala. (WHNT) – The April 28th tornados left dozens of Clements High School students homeless. But other students, parents, teachers and even total strangers are pitching in to make sure those kids have what they need.

There’s a very special bulletin board in clements high school.

“This is our giving tree. These are wishes that the students affected by the storm gave us, things that they need personally,” says school counselor Shannon Garrison.

Like the Angel Tree efforts you see around Christmas, those who want to help can meet the specific needs or wishes of a student. Dozens of Clements High School students were left homeless by last months tornados. And despite the fact that they lost so much, they were all reluctant to tell anyone what they need.

“They’re so generous and so kind and when we asked them what do you need they always say someone else needs something more. I really don’t need anything. But they finally, we sat down and interviewed each one of them individually and they gave us some wishes and personal items that were lost,” Garrison said.

Other students who were not affected by the tornado, along with parents, teachers, even total strangers all came forward to help.

“I was touched by a couple of the kids, asking for things for their brothers and their sisters, their mothers and their dads,” says Harry Hames, a member of the Beltline Church of Christ in Decatur. He, along with his church and a Decatur business, pitched in and bought a stack of Walmart gift cards so the students could get the personal items they need.

“It’s the great commission. You know, when people hurt, in the South you go out and help your neighbor.” Hames said.

Garrison says the most common request from students was for a new Bible to replace one lost in the storm. A case of them was delivered on Thursday.

Another common request from students was for prepaid gas cards. many of them are living elsewhere and have to travel a long distances to get to school.