Amazon’s drone delivery: How would it work?

Posted on: 4:45 am, December 4, 2013, by , updated on: 04:46am, December 4, 2013

(Image Credit: Amazon/ CNN.com)

(Image Credit: Amazon/ CNN.com)

(CNN) — Imaginations everywhere have been stoked since Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced his company plans to start offering 30-minute deliveries via drone-like “octocopters.”

What’s not fascinating about a near future in which fleets of whirring sky robots can drop our every impulse buy on our doorstep faster than we can get Chinese delivered? (You know, aside from accidental strayings into restricted air space or the rise of the machines.)

But when Bezos took to “60 Minutes” on Sunday to introduce the world to Amazon Prime Air, his idea prompted more questions than it provided answers.

So how close are we, really, to door-to-door drones becoming a reality? And how would they work?

We reached out to Amazon, where official details are still scarce, and chatted with drone expert Missy Cummings, an associate professor at MIT and one of the Navy’s first female fighter pilots. Here’s some of what we’ve been able to piece together on a project that Amazon says is, at the very least, a couple of years away from takeoff.

Could drones really be delivering packages by 2015?

That’s what Bezos said is the best possible scenario. But Cummings, a longtime advocate for the commercial use of drones, thinks that’s optimistic.

The Federal Aviation Administration needs to sign off on Amazon’s flight plans, and Cummings says the agency hasn’t been quick to move on the domestic use of drones.

“I think they (Amazon) are stepping out in a typically naive way, (but) maybe they have some secret insight to the FAA that I don’t have,” she said.

Cummings predicts the company will get approval to start Prime Air in other countries before the United States, but she says that having a retail and technology giant like Amazon pushing for it could speed things up for everyone.

“I don’t want anybody to think this is right around the corner,” Bezos warned during the “60 Minutes” interview.

How will I know if I’m eligible for a drone visit?

Bezos said the octocopters will have a 10-mile radius. So, it’s likely that folks in big cities near Amazon distribution sites would be a lot more likely to qualify than those in more remote areas.

He says they’ll initially carry items up to five pounds, which is roughly 86% of all deliveries Amazon makes.

But for even that 10-mile range to work, Amazon better be onto something about battery life that the rest of us don’t know. Cummings said drones the size of the octocopters have a battery life of about 30 minutes, and the weight of their cargo could make that even shorter.

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The above text is excerpted directly from an article appearing at CNN.com. Click here to read the full story.

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