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New Johnson High School Leadership to ‘Hit the Ground Running’ in Huntsville

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) - A new school year brings new beginnings for everyone. But that is particularly true for the administration, teachers and students at Johnson High School in Huntsville. The school is boasting brand new leaders this year.

Eric T. Jones, Teresa McDaniel and Roderick Tomlin came to Huntsville from the Jackson Central-Merry Academy of Medical Technology in Jackson, Tenn. Jones was the principal of the health sciences magnet school, and McDaniel and Tomlin are his assistant principals.

The trio have retained their positions at Johnson. Principal Jones says he and his team are ready to hit the ground running at the home of the jaguars.

“We’ve really built a great bond and had a little bit of success,” said Jones humbly.

But don’t let the humility fool you. Jones, his secretary and assistant principals bring undeniable clout to J.O. Johnson High. The team is responsible for reviving a failing urban school in Tennessee from dire straights to soaring success. Jones says though, any new situation poses its challenges.

“Learning a new way of doing things and a new environment and the students and faculty getting used to a new way conducting business in the school-house.”

Jones says that includes pointed expectations, consistency and structure. The school system was so impressed by Jones and his team they were sought for years to join Huntsville City Schools. Since their arrival Jones says he has been quite impressed too.

“I could not ask for a better group of faculty members – they are phenomenal,” beamed Jones.

Jones says it takes time to establish a culture but he is confident in his team’s vision.

“I’m eternally grateful they thought enough of the vision we were able to establish at our previous setting to come here and do it again.”

The new Johnson administrators are credited with taking their previous school to such heights, it is now seen as a national model school under the U.S. Department of Education’s turn-around program.